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Thoughts on what businesses actually need from the Cloud, not what vendors wish they needed.

Chris Bliss

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Top Stories by Chris Bliss

Here at VM we’re planning our spring 2011 conference tour and we’re happy to say there’s a lot going on in the world of presentations and meetings about cloud-computing. Deadlines are fast-approaching though, so check out the list we’ve put together below and see if there’s something happening near you… hope to see you there! Note: this list is incomplete and bound to change. Descriptions were taken off the sponsoring organizations’ websites and so may not reflect content and/or quality. Don’t hold us accountable if a conference sucks. What: Global Services Conference 2011: Enabling Business Transformation Through Global Sourcing When: January 27, 2011 Where: NYC Cost: $1295.00 conference fee for consultants/providers Info: http://www.globalservicesmedia.com/events/gsc2011/ “There are… forces playing out in the industry that define the next generation of services ... (more)

Definitions for Dummies: What Is Cloud Computing?

We’ve been absent from the blogosphere for awhile now and thought we’d make our reentry with a simple definition. Cloud computing. What is it? How is it different from, well, normal computing? What does it mean for business owners? Where is it headed? Generally speaking, “cloud computing” is the use of the Internet to run applications or store data. Until recently, most software programs ran on your personal computer. Cloud computing changes that: programs run on a remote server (or servers), accessed by (but not stored on) your computer. Web-based email? Cloud computing. Google... (more)

Community Feedback is Good. Kinda.

Yes, this is a repost, but it’s just so good we couldn’t help ourselves… The Support, It Is a-Changin’ In the good ‘ole days when software still need installing and executives regularly printed their emails, software “support” was a strange thing. Sure, Microsoft had helplines you could call, and Quicken came with a manual, but it wasn’t “support” per se: more like a robotic attempt to appease the odd granny or two. Software personified the impersonal. These days that’s all changing. As cloud computing and SaaS go mainstream, software vendors are increasingly connected with consu... (more)

Getting Bought by Salesforce is Bad News for Thinkfuse Users

Last week we received an email from Thinkfuse, a cloud app that delivers “simple status reports.” To make a long story short, they told us (and their many customers) that they were purchased by Salesforce and were shutting down operations. Here’s a screenshot of the email: Getting bought by Salesforce is big news for Thinkfuse. They probably made a splash load of cash for themselves and their investors. They’re now involved with a product serving millions of subscribers, instead of a few thousand. They’re moving up the totem pole. Unfortunately, the deal is less good news for Thin... (more)

Software Implementations and the Sunk Cost Fallacy

Let’s say you buy nonrefundable, nontransferable tickets to see the Superbowl. In economics, that’s a “sunk cost” – an irretrievable past expenditure. Now say the Superbowl comes and you feel sick. Really sick. You’re convinced that going will be less fun than staying at home – but because you bought the tickets, you go anyways (and have a terrible time, especially if you’re a Broncos fan). “Sunk cost” – get it? Game theorists call this self-defeating behavior the “Concorde fallacy,” after the ill-advised Concorde plane, which operated for decades despite never making (or bein... (more)